Oast House Biere De Garde Farmhouse Ale

20150122-201111.jpg
Pours cloudy dark amber-brown. Notes of toffee and crème brûlée on the nose. The palate is smoky and reminiscent of Rauchbier with much more sweetness. The finish is velvety smooth and pleasant. Recommended.
@oasthousebrewers

“The Braveheart”

20150101-020357.jpg
If you’re still awake and looking for your next taste sensation may I humbly suggest the cocktail my father invented. A Braveheart consists of equal parts Scotch and Tawny Port served neat or on the rocks. In this case I used Té Bheag Blended Scotch Whisky and Warre’s Otima 10 Year Tawny Port. Enjoy, and HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!

Sawdust City 11.05 Triple India Pale Ale

20141221-145846.jpg
Collaboration between brewmasters Sam Corbeil and Ryan Morrow of Nickel Brook.
Pours cloudy amber orange. Nose of tropical fruit and pine resin. Loads of hop of the palate encircled by orange citrus and palate scraping bitterness. The finishing is pleasantly long. Highly recommended.

Flying Monkeys City and Colour Imperial Maple Wheat (after 62 weeks ageing in my cellar)

20141116-232725.jpg
Pours a cloudy/muddy dark brown. The nose has grown stronger and the maple more pungent. On the palate though it suffers from the same imbalance as the aged BNL Imperial Chocolate Stout—the maple and the alcohol have gone in different directions creating an unruliness on the palate. It swerves from unctuous syrupy sweetness to bitter, alcoholic bite. While definitely still drinkable it has not improved over it’s original tasting.

My original review:
Dark brown. Like walking into a pancake breakfast at the church hall, the smell of butter melting into maple syrup on hot flapjacks leaps out of the glass and follow onto the palate. The sensation is balance with a pleasant baker’s chocolate bitterness that comes through on the finish. One of the best maple-infused beers I’ve ever tasted. Highly recommended.

Flying Monkeys BNL Imperial Chocolate Stout after 83 weeks in my cellar

20141110-214343.jpg
Still pours oily black-brown with a fluffy, undulating chocolate milk coloured head. The nose leaps out of the glass. I could smell it while pouring an arms-length away. The nose seems more ‘separated’ than I remember. As though a year in the cellar has caused the chocolate and the alcohol to strike-out in their own directions. The result is almost astringent, although underlying notes of dark cherry and vanilla come through with deeper inhales. The phenomenon is repeated on the palate where the chocolate and the alcohol seem to fight for balance. One could definitely say that ageing has brought complexity to this brew; however, this might be a case where complications aren’t necessarily a good thing.

My original review:
Motor oil black; Black Forest cake nose; chocolate & cherry on the palate with only a hint of bitterness.